Neurosis


Neurosis, also known as psychoneurosis or neurotic disorder, is a "catch all" term that refers to any mental imbalance that causes distress, but, unlike a psychosis or some personality disorders, does not prevent or affect rational thought.

A chronic disorder featuring irritability of the nervous system (nervousness) and characterized by anxiety and/or extreme behavior dedicated to avoid anxiety situations.

Many people believe neuroses are not a very serious psychological problem, since the biggest part of our planetís population suffers from neurosis. This is a common disease that people tend to consider irrelevant. However, neurosis is the beginning of psychosis and schizophrenia, and if it is not treated, the person may completely lose their human conscience forever because this is an irreversible process.

Neurosis is the beginning of the invasion of the wild content of our psychic sphere into our human conscience. This invasion can be interrupted and we can prevent the wild, evil, and absurd content to continue its destruction of the human part of our conscience, but we have to first cooperate with the unconscious that orients us through our dreamsí messages.

A neurotic patient is someone whose psychological functions are not normally functioning. This personís thoughts, feelings, intuitions and sensations are different from what they were before the invasion of the wild ancient content of the psychic sphere in the human conscience. This invasion can have many characteristics, according to each personís psychological type. Each person has a psychological type according to the most developed psychological function of their psychic sphere. For instance, we notice that neurotics are always anxious, afraid, and suspecting that someone will do something harmful against them. They start having the need for some protection against their invisible enemies and thatís why they start over-protecting themselves. They live only in fear of other peopleís opinion, just because they are insecure and afraid of their bad intentions. There are many different and specific characteristics for the neurosis of each psychological type.

The intention of this wild content is to make the person feel victimized by other people, so that they may want to take revenge and this way completely lose what still remains of their human conscience in their psychic sphere, or it tries to make the person do terrible things against others. This is the tactic used by the wild part of the psychic sphere in order to provoke conflicts with tragic consequences, so that it may be able to control the personís behaviour completely, after completely destroying their human conscience by provoking despair.

This is the beginning of an even worse kind of craziness, which can take many shapes. However, if we perceive this invasion and start fighting against this wild and absurd content, we can prevent the destruction it causes and transform it into the human part of our conscience. We can learn how to change our behaviour without following our inner tendencies, while developing all our psychological functions.

Each one of us has only one psychological function completely developed and another one partially developed. The other two functions that never had the chance to be developed through consciousness are completely wild. Only if we learn how we can carefully transform this dangerous content into a healthy and balanced content can we save our human conscience and become wiser after the psychic transformation. Otherwise, this content will always be a threat to us. The neurosis it provokes can be easily treated if the invasion is only in the beginning and the patient gets immediate help from a psychotherapist or from dream interpretation, which is doubtlessly the safest cure for craziness, since the unconscious that produces our dreams knows our psychic problems very well.

Without any treatment, a neurosis can become a worse psychic disease with time, even though we may not be able to recognize its worse state unless the patient starts exhibiting very violent behaviour.
Christina Sponias